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Temple of the WorldSanctuaries, Cults, and Mysteries of Ancient Egypt$
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Miroslav Verner

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9789774165634

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774165634.001.0001

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The Kingdom of Amun

The Kingdom of Amun

Chapter:
(p.167) (p.168) (p.169) 5 The Kingdom of Amun
Source:
Temple of the World
Author(s):

Miroslav Verner

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774165634.003.0005

With the reunification of the country Egypt found itself in the New Kingdom, on the threshold of its greatest era of political and cultural flowering. The political and religious center was Thebes, although Memphis was the main administrative and, at certain periods, royal seat of the country. The Theban rulers achieved victory under the banner of their local god Amun. During the Middle Kingdom Amun had already been merged with Re, the powerful sun god of Heliopolis, in a new form: Amun-Re. The origins and initial meaning of the cult of the god Amun have been the subject of debate among Egyptologists for a long time. Amun, ‘The Kind of the Gods,’ who was honoured with many other lofty epithets, was most often represented in human form. His body was usually colored blue to signify that he is a god of the sky. He wears a crown adorned with two plumes, and sometimes also a sun disc. He was a god-creator. The temple precinct of Amun lies just a few hundred meters east of the Nile. It was originally connected to the river by a canal and the ‘Way of the Rams.’

Keywords:   Thebes, Amun, Karnak, Akh menu, Khonsu, Ipet, Ptah, Abu Simbel, Excursus

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