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Christianity and Monasticism in Northern EgyptBeni Suef, Giza, Cairo, and the Nile Delta$
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Gawdat Gabra and Hany N. Takla

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9789774167775

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774167775.001.0001

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Toward the Localization of the Hennaton Monastic Complex

Toward the Localization of the Hennaton Monastic Complex

Chapter:
(p.37) 5 Toward the Localization of the Hennaton Monastic Complex
Source:
Christianity and Monasticism in Northern Egypt
Author(s):

Mary Ghattas

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774167775.003.0005

This chapter describes the most prominent of the Pachomian monasteries, the Hennaton monastery or Dayr al-Zujaj (as it is designated today), and the debates about its exact location. The Hennaton was a monastic center of Byzantine and medieval Egypt, one that attracted pilgrims and believers from Egypt and the whole world. However, the only surviving traces of its existence today are artistic depictions vouching for what once was a grand existence. Its prestigious reputation inspired kings to leave behind their earthly kingdoms, attracted pilgrims from all over the world, drew native Egyptians into the ascetic life, and finally, produced both patriarchs and saints whose memory is immortalized in the history of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

Keywords:   Pachomian monasteries, Hennaton monastery, Dayr al-Zujaj, Christianity, monasticism

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