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Mrs. Naunakhte & FamilyThe Women of Ramesside Deir al-Medina$
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Koenraad Donker van Heel

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9789774167737

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774167737.001.0001

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Protecting Your Daughter’s Rights

Protecting Your Daughter’s Rights

Chapter:
(p.195) 15 Protecting Your Daughter’s Rights
Source:
Mrs. Naunakhte & Family
Author(s):

Koenraad Donker van Heel

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774167737.003.0015

This chapter examines how Deir al-Medina fathers protected their daughters. It begins with a discussion of how a Deir al-Medina girl who married a workman from the village would remain close to her family, and from time to time would flee their husbands back to the parental home. This is evident in a limestone ostracon involving the workman Telmontu, who complained to the chief workman Khonsu and the scribe Amunnakhte son of Ipuy about his son-in-law, evidently in defense of his daughter. The chapter considers another case of a father coming to the rescue of his daughter: an ostracon containing a statement by the workman Horemwia to a person who seems to be his daughter. Finally, it cites another ostracon containing a case of theft from some storehouses.

Keywords:   fathers, daughters, Deir al-Medina, ostracon, Telmontu, Khonsu, Amunnakhte, Horemwia, theft, husbands

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