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Subjects of Empires/Citizens of StatesYemenis in Djibouti and Ethiopia$
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Samson A. Bezabeh

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9789774167294

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774167294.001.0001

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Disciplining the Natives

Disciplining the Natives

Chapter:
(p.29) 2. Disciplining the Natives
Source:
Subjects of Empires/Citizens of States
Author(s):

Samson A. Bezabeh

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774167294.003.0002

This chapter examines how the mobility of Yemenis during the first half of the twentieth century was structured in three spaces; namely the sea, port spaces, and the hinterland. To dispel the myth of free travel, and also not to create a false dichotomy between a precolonial period marked by the free movement of people and a colonial period marked by increased control, this chapter first looks at the structures of control used to regulate the movement of people in the precolonial period. It then provides a brief account of precolonial regulatory mechanisms, before looking at Yemeni interactions with this process under the influence of state/empire, beginning from the end of the nineteenth century.

Keywords:   sea, port spaces, hinterland, precolonial period, precolonial regulatory mechanisms, Yemeni mobility

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