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Ottoman Egypt and the Emergence of the Modern World1500-1800$
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Nelly Hanna

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9789774166648

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774166648.001.0001

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Egypt from 1600 to 1800: Between Local and Global

Egypt from 1600 to 1800: Between Local and Global

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Egypt from 1600 to 1800: Between Local and Global
Source:
Ottoman Egypt and the Emergence of the Modern World
Author(s):

Nelly Hanna

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774166648.003.0001

The mainstream view in historical studies considers the main sources of modern world history to be the Reformation, the expansion of Europe into America and Asia, the formation of trading companies, and scientific discoveries. All these originate in Europe, considering the non-European world (Egypt included) “outside of history.” The book attempts to redress this bias by exploring a number of channels. One of these is to identify worldwide trends, such as international trade, that touched not only Egypt but also India, Southeast Asia, and Europe, and had a bearing on many aspects of life. A second channel explores Egypt’s position in this trade. The vitality of its textile industry and trade (prior to the introduction of mechanized production) allowed it to export its cloth to many parts of the world. Another channel is the exchanges of know-how and technology. The book shows that in the 18th century these were far from being one-way exchanges from Europe to the rest of the world. Multiple exchanges in numerous directions that included the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman Empires suggest a multi-centered rather than a unipolar world during the early modern period.

Keywords:   ‘outside history’, Eurocentric, textiles, trade, technology, Mughal Empire, Safawid Empire, Ottoman Empire

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