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An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians$
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Edward William Lane

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9789774165603

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774165603.001.0001

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Periodical Public Festivals, & c.

Periodical Public Festivals, & c.

Chapter:
Chapter 24 Periodical Public Festivals, & c.
Source:
An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians
Author(s):

Edward William Lane

Jason Thompson

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774165603.003.0024

This and the following two chapters describe the many public festivals celebrated in Cairo, starting off in the first month of Muslim year, Moharram. This chapter explains that this was a period considered blessed and when alms were given, but was also associated with superstitions about the jinn. The tenth of Moharram is Youm al-Ashoura, the day al-Hussein was martyred, and many would fast on this day. Descriptions of the food, street celebrations, and religious rituals that took place are given. Next, it turns to the return to Cairo of the caravan of pilgrims from the Hajj to Mecca and the procession of the Mahmal to the Citadel. This took place at the end of Safar, the second Muslim month, and this chapter includes the author’s account of this occasion in 1824. Last in this chapter is Mulid al-Nabi, the Prophet’s birthday, in the third month. The performers, processions, entertainers (reciters, dancing girls, etc., as described in previous chapters), are described, as is the zikr and darwishes’ rituals. Translations and musical notation are included too.

Keywords:   Festivals, Mulid, Hajj, Pilgrims, Youm al-Ashoura, Zikr, Darwishes

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