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Coptic Identity and Ayyubid Politics in Egypt1218–1250$
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Kurt J. Werthmuller

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9789774163456

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774163456.001.0001

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The Politics of Conversion and Apostasy

The Politics of Conversion and Apostasy

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 The Politics of Conversion and Apostasy
Source:
Coptic Identity and Ayyubid Politics in Egypt
Author(s):

Kurt J. Werthmuller

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774163456.003.0005

The issue of religious conversion is the main topic discussed here in this chapter. The Christian and Muslim communities of Egypt in the Middle Ages allowed for a contentious and controversial inter-confessional conversion, and this is really surprising despite the early Islamic influence in Egypt. The constraining theories of the conversion of Copts to a numerical minority is discussed here. In addition, the different views create a contrast about the impetus and method of the Islamization of Egypt, but then there is also agreement on the fact that the process was uneven, incomplete, and certainly less than immediate during the early centuries of Islamic rule. On the contrary, the issue of religious conversion did not end with conversion and reversion to Christianity.

Keywords:   Christian, Muslim, Middle Ages, Islamic, Christianity

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