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Amarna SunsetNefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian
Counter-Reformation$
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Aidan Dodson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789774163043

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774163043.001.0001

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Introduction: Sunrise

Introduction: Sunrise

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: Sunrise
Source:
Amarna Sunset
Author(s):

Aidan Dodson

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774163043.003.0001

Egypt was in her height of powers in the middle of the 14th century BC. Thutmoside kings of the earlier part of the Eighteenth Dynasty had created a network of client-states stretching its 600 kilometers up to Syria, and Egypt's Nubian possession stretched a similar distance to south Aswan. The wealth of these areas financed new great building projects throughout the countries including sanctuaries far into Nubia and beyond the Fourth Cataract. Kings in Egypt were not just rulers but they were also treated and revered as gods, like Amenhotep III, who in his thirtieth regnal year emerged as a solar deity with markedly changed iconography. During Amenhotep's reign, traditional gods continued to enjoy full royal patronage through the foundation and extension of temples, and also through the appointment of the crown prince, Thutmose.

Keywords:   Egypt, kings, gods, temples, Thutmose, iconography, Amenhotep, Syria, Nubia

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