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Industrial Policy in the Middle East and North AfricaRethinking the Role of the State$
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Ahmed Galal

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9789774160509

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774160509.001.0001

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Do Governments Pick Winners or Losers? an Assessment of Industrial Policy in Egypt

Do Governments Pick Winners or Losers? an Assessment of Industrial Policy in Egypt

Chapter:
(p.11) Chapter 2 Do Governments Pick Winners or Losers? an Assessment of Industrial Policy in Egypt
Source:
Industrial Policy in the Middle East and North Africa
Author(s):

Ahmed Galal

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774160509.003.0002

Shortage of products in the global markets and the drive for rapid diversification and industrialization led Egypt to erect high trade barriers to protect domestic industries and provide support to large national projects. Markets played a modest role in resource allocations and planning was the name of the game for almost a decade and a half. Egypt opted for a partial liberalization of the economy under the name of infitah or “open door policy” in the mid-1970s. Partial liberalization ironically amounted to increased selective intervention as segments of the economy were liberalized while others were left unaffected. Egypt embarked on a program that involved price and trade liberalization, privatization, a reduction of subsidies and taxes, and deregulation.

Keywords:   diversification, partial liberalization, resource allocations, subsidies, deregulation

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