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Transforming Education In EgyptWestern Influence and Domestic Policy Reform$
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Fatma H. Sayed

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9789774160165

Published to Cairo Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5743/cairo/9789774160165.001.0001

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External and Internal Security Pressures and Their Implications For Decision-making In Basic Education

External and Internal Security Pressures and Their Implications For Decision-making In Basic Education

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter 2 External and Internal Security Pressures and Their Implications For Decision-making In Basic Education
Source:
Transforming Education In Egypt
Author(s):

Fatma H. Sayed

Publisher:
American University in Cairo Press
DOI:10.5743/cairo/9789774160165.003.0003

Basic education in Egypt has been referred to as a matter of “national security” in every single presidential speech, ministerial press release, and official governmental statement addressing the topic since the beginning of the 1990s. Various foreign powers had a direct or indirect influence on Egypt's basic education policies in the past, and this power was exercised to reinforce their dominion over the country. The issue of Middle East's regional stability continues to influence international community concern over basic education in Egypt. National security also has an issue that affected education policy, and these issues are reflected on education. Education has always been considered as a national security issue, although various definitions of national security are interpreted differently by domestic actors, Egyptian state, and foreign donors.

Keywords:   Egypt, education, foreign donors, national security, education policy, domestic actors

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